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Bebop Spoken There

Frank Zappa: "There was so much acid during the '60s that it was very easy for large numbers of people to think they had seen God as soon as the Beatles went boom, boom, boom, you know?." - (DownBeat May 18, 1978). – (DownBeat May 18, 1978).

Ryan Keberle: “Don't be easy on yourself when it comes to playing with perfect intonation. All other instruments will be playing with close-to-perfect intonation; the same should be expected of trombonists.'” – (DownBeat April 2018)

Today Thursday March 22


Vieux Carré Jazzmen - Holystone, Whitley Road, Holystone NE27 0DA. Tel: 266 6173. 1:00pm. Free.

Higher Education & Research Presents: Future Grooves - Sage Gateshead. 12 noon. £5.00. Showcase performances by BMus & BA degree course students featuring jazz and non-jazz sets.

Tees Valley Jazzmen - White Horse Hotel, Burtree Lane, Harrowgate Hill, Darlington DL1 3AD. Tel: 01325 463262. 1:30pm. Free.


MGB: Milne Glendinning Band - The Globe, Railway Street, Newcastle NE4 7AD. 7:30pm. £5.00. Milne, Glendinning, Katy Trigger (bass) & Nik Alevroyiannis (drums).

BABMUS @ Jazz Café, Pink Lane, Newcastle NE1 5DW. 8:00pm. £3.00. (£2.00. students/MU).

Rob Heron & the Tea Pad Orchestra - St Cuthbert’s Centre, Church Hill, Crook DL15 9DN. Tel: 01388 765002. 7:30pm. £7.50., £5.00. child, £20.00. family.

Higher Education & Research Presents: Future Grooves - Sage Gateshead. 7:30pm. £5.00. Showcase performances by BMus & BA degree course students featuring jazz and non-jazz sets.

Ada Francis & the Italic Quartet - Las Iguanas, Grey Street, Newcastle NE1 6AF. Tel: 0191 232 9729. 7:30pm. Fortnightly restaurant residency. Line-up: Ada Francis (vocals); Jimmy Jefford (tenor saxophone); Ben Richardson (piano); Luke Gaul (bass) & Harry Still (drums).

New Orleans Preservation Jazz Band - Oxbridge, Oxbridge Lane, Stockton on Tees TS18 4AW. 8:30pm.

Maine Street Jazzmen - Potter’s Wheel, Sunniside, Gateshead NE16 5EE. Tel: 0191 488 8068. 8:30pm. Free.

Tees Hot Club w. Gus Smith (vocal); Richie Emmerson (tenor); Bruce Taylor (keys) - Dorman’s Club, Oxford Road, Middlesbrough TS5 5DT. Tel: 01642 823813. 9pm. Free.

To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Wednesday, August 09, 2017

Farewell to Glen Campbell and Barbara Cook.

The lights will be dimmed in Nashville and on Broadway tonight in tribute to the passing of two legends from two very different genres who both died yesterday (August 8)
Glen Campbell is best remembered for his hits from the 1970's that included Wichita Lineman, Galveston, By the Time I Get to Phoenix and Rhinestone Cowboy. Country songs that were as comfortable in the pop charts of the day as they were on Grand Ol' Opry. As well as being a fine country singer, Campbell was no mean guitarist - you had to be in Nashville - and he played guitar on Sinatra's Strangers in the Night. Like yesterday's other departure, Campbell also struggled with alcohol (and drug) problems but he overcame them and they haven't tarnished his memory.
That memory was kept alive at this year's SummerTyne Americana, held, as always, at Sage Gateshead where Glen's youngest daughter Ashley Campbell and her band played a support set to Merle Haggard's Strangers. Reading Ann Alex's write-up, I got the impression the billing should have been reversed. Ashley, reported Ann, commented on her dad's Alzheimer's before singing Gentle on my Mind. Now, 17 days later he's gone - he was 81.
Rest In Peace.  
Barbara Cook was another legend who passed away yesterday and, like Campbell, had an alcohol affected career. A Broadway star in the 1950's receiving a Tony award for her role in The Music Man
she appeared in many more Broadways smashes as well playing straight roles on television. A critic wrote of her, many years later: "The world is usually divided into actresses who try to sing and singers who try to act. Cook is one of the few performers who manage to combine the best of both traditions."
It looked like her career was over when the alcohol took hold and binge eating caused her to become obese. However, after befriending composer and pianist Wally Harper he persuaded her to put on a concert at Carnegie Hall. This was so successful they did another (of which I have the CD) and the rest is history. The second concert was predominantly the songs of Stephen Sondheim and, from then on she became synonymous with his work.
A Broadway legend who will be sadly missed.
Barbara Cook was 89.
Vanilla Ice Cream (see comment by Liz)


Liz said...

I loved Barbara Cook. I saw her live many years ago, it was either at the Donmar or the Menier Chocolate factory in London. Both are ideal venues for her type of intimate revue. It was just her & Wally Harper, her accompanist. I was enthralled by her singing and acting. The one song with which I associate her is "Ice cream, Vanilla ice cream" it is from a show called " She Loves Me" which has since been reprised many times. This show, with which she took the lead in the far off Soubrette days, belongs to her, and her only. Such a talent! RIP wonderful lady!

Steve T said...

Campbell is the only male c+w singer I've come across who I have any time for. His final album, knowingly and poignantly titled 'Adios', has a CD of hits and one of new stuff.
'Rhinestone Cowboy' is a perfect popsong to rival 'Dancing Queen'. I played it for an elderly neighbour and his face lit up; 'they don't make em like this any more' I observed, 'in fact they'll probably never make them like this again'.
As a soul fan, Isaac Hayes' 19 min version of 'By the time I get to Pheonix' is supposed to be the ultimate version, but I confess to preferring Campbells, though William Bell, who plays it straight, has the definitive version.
The other track that interested me was 'Gentle on my Mind', by far and away the best track I've ever heard by Maddy Peyroux. I knew his version immediately but hadn't connected them as hers is a spine-tingling ballad while his is a an upbeat, uptempo romp.
Haven't heard the new stuff yet but there's a version of Willie Nelsons 'Funny How Time Slips Away' which I can't believe he hasn't already recorded, and is always worth a listen.
Yip, he was one of the good guys and, as Lance observed, a serious guitarist.

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About this blog - contact details.

Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: I look forward to hearing from you.